WORST HARLEM SHAKE EVER

SAATCHI & SAATCHI / LEO BURNETT, Amsterdam / PARKINSON VERENIGING / 2013

CampaignCampaign(opens in a new tab)
Case Film

Overview

Credits

Overview

CampaignDescription

Nearly 70,000 Dutch people suffer from Parkinson’s disease: a progressive brain disease that causes patients to lose the ability to control their body movements. Outsiders have little understanding of the disease, which leads to fewer donations. Therefore not enough research can be done. Since severe shaking is one of the many symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, The Harlem Shake hype came at just the right time. We followed up on it with 'The Worst Harlem Shake ever'. In contrast to all the other Harlem Shakes, our version had a serious message: 'Shaking. Fun for some... Daily struggle for others'. Due to this unexpected message, we made viewers aware of the severity of the disease. Eric Roos, Chairman of the Dutch Parkinson’s Foundation and a Parkinson’s patient himself played the leading role. He intentionally didn’t take his medication so the whole world could see what Parkinson’s can do.

Effectiveness

With the publication of the ‘Worst Harlem Shake Ever’, the following quantitative objectives were formulated by the Dutch Parkinson’s Foundation:

> 8,000 YouTube views

> 50% positive reviews on the YouTube channel.

Ultimately, the campaign led to the following results:

> 1,000,000 Combined number of views (Various versions on YouTube and Vimeo. Various ‘own video players’ such as The Sun, Daily Telegraph, etc.)

80.23% Positive reviews on the original YouTube video

87.7% Average playing time (average to the 25th second)

47% Absolute viewers loyalty

169 Countries where the film was viewed

> 10,000 Initial Tweets from featured articles

> 5,000 Initial Likes from featured articles

+ 1,406.28% Facebook visits

+ 141.56% Website visits.

News sites and bloggers in > 70 countries shared the video and wrote about it.

A lot of free PR which brought Parkinson’s disease on peoples agenda.

And all that with a budget of € 0.

Implementation

On 26 February 2013, we placed the ‘Worst Harlem Shake Ever’ on YouTube. Within a week, the video was viewed more than 100,000 times. A couple of days later, the film was banned due to a music rights issue. People expressed their disbelief about this on Twitter and blogs. However, what seemed to mark the end of our campaign actually provided a tremendous boost. Within no-time, ‘mirrors’ of the ‘Worst Harlem Shake Ever’ appeared on YouTube, Vimeo and internal video players. News sites also wrote about our 'shake'. Since all sorts of media shared our message, the conversation about Parkinson’s and the Dutch Parkinson’s Foundation stayed alive.

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